Toyota and Lexus said Monday they plan to start deployment of Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) systems on vehicles sold in the United States starting in 2021, with the goal of adoption across most of its lineup by the mid-2020s.

According to the companies, the vehicles would be able to talk to each other and the surrounding environment, and will represent a significant step forward in creating a safer and more efficient driving ecosystem while advancing connected and automated technology deployment.

The technology does not require a cellular or data network, and vehicles equipped with DSRC do not incur any cellular network carrier charges, according to Toyota. DSRC is based on industry standards, so Toyota vehicles will be able to communicate with other automakers’ equipped vehicles, multiplying the safety benefits for all, the company stated.

“By allowing vehicles’ intelligent systems to collaborate more broadly and effectively through DSRC technology, we can help drivers realize a future with zero fatalities from crashes, better traffic flow and less congestion,” said Jim Lentz, CEO of Toyota Motor North America (TMNA).

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DSRC transmissions enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications supports the broadcast of precise anonymized vehicle information several times per second, including location, speed and acceleration.

This information can be used by other DSRC-enabled vehicles and devices to help drivers prevent collisions.  Communication can also be enabled to provide helpful real-time information to drivers, such as potential hazards, slow or stopped vehicles ahead, or signals, signs, and road conditions that may be difficult to see, said Toyota.

The Obama administration in December 2016 proposed requiring the technology and giving automakers at least four years to comply. The proposal requires automakers to ensure all vehicles speak the same language through a standard technology.

In 2017, General Motors Co began offering vehicle-to-vehicle technologies on its Cadillac CTS model, but it is currently the only commercially available vehicle with the system.